[Video] The Dawn of a New Nightlife & Daylife Era

Image courtesy of Palms Casino Resort / Station Casinos

Back in 2001, the Palms Casino Resort opened and changed the landscape of nightlife and daylife in Las Vegas. The Palms pool wasn't just a resort amenity, it was a place for tourists and locals to see and be seen.

Seventeen years later, nearly one billions dollars was spent to renovate the Palms property. And just 9 days after the 2019 Nightclub & Bar Show concluded, the freshly reimagined and remodeled Palms pool area had its grand opening. KAOS, the 73,000-square-foot dayclub and 29,000-square-foot nightclub experience, and the Palms have once again changed daylife and nightlife not just in Las Vegas but across the globe.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by KAOS Dayclub & Nightclub (@kaosvegas) on

Ronn Nicolli, senior V.P. of creative strategy for the Palms, presented KAOS to 2019 Nightclub & Bar attendees on the second day of the show. Along with a panel of nightlife experts and partners, Nicolli explained how he and his team introduced bleeding edge tech (like the 270-foot interactive LED screen that oversees KAOS), architecture, design details, and talent to bring KAOS and the Palms' new experience from vision to reality.

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Further, Nicolli, Ryan Craig, Ryan Perrings, and Henry Martinez revealed the features and experiences that today's consumer wants and expects from daylife and nightlife operations. The panel can be viewed in its entirety below.

 

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